High-value foods worth more than $20 billion a year

10 April 2017
Measuring what counts: Export revenue from New Zealand high-value foods A report from the Centre for High-Value Nutrition setting a baseline for export revenue from high-value foods.

The New Zealand economy benefits by more than $20 billion a year in export revenue from high-value nutrition food exports.

The figure comes from Measuring what counts: Export revenue of New Zealand’s High-Value Foods, a report published by the Centre for High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge. The report, prepared by consultants PwC, sets out the methodology to measure the financial value of exports of high-value foods. The report groups high-value foods into three categories: foods that have proven health claims; foods that have general health claims and foods that are especially nutritious.

Challenge Director Joanne Todd said the report for the first time estimated the export revenue of high value foods, and by doing so, sets out the opportunity for the country to raise foods for health and wellness up the value chain.  Worldwide there is strong interest in food with health benefits, but nowhere more so than in China where the health and wellness food and beverage market has grown by almost 18% in five years. Chinese consumers, and consumers elsewhere, will pay a premium for food with health benefits. But for those foods to have inherent and lasting value, the health claims need to be backed by the best science. The Measuring what counts: Export revenue of New Zealand’s High-Value Foods report reveals that food with substantiated health claims constituted in 2015, only a little more than $1 billion of the total high-value food export revenue. The report was commissioned to establish a baseline, which the Centre for High-Value Nutrition will track over time, as one way to assess how well New Zealand’s reputation grows as a country with exceptional and innovative science behind foods grown in a safe and clean environment.