Science of Food Publications

Science of Food

 

 

Year Authors Title Summary Published
2020 Acevedo-Fani A, Dave A, and Singh H. Nature-assembled structures for delivery of bioactive compounds and their potential in functional foods Review discussing the structure and biological function of different nature-assembled carriers, preparation/isolation methods, some of the advantages and challenges in their use as bioactive compound delivery systems, and their behavior during digestion.

Frontiers in Chemistry: Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics

ARTICLE

 

2020 Le HD, Loveday SM, Nowak E, Niu Z, and Singh H. Pectin emulsions for colon-targeted release of propionic acid Study assessing a designed emulsion system’s ability to resist gastric and intestinal digestion for targeted delivery of compounds. Pectin concentrations of >2.5 wt% improved the emulsion’s resistance to coalescence, reducing the rate of lipolysis and degree of hydrolysis. Use of pectin to form resistant emulsions has potential as an approach to delay digestion.

Food Hydrocolloids

ARTICLE

2020 Niu Z, Acevedo-Fani A, McDowell A, Barnett A, Loveday SM, and Singh H. Nanoemulsion structure and food matrix determine the gastrointestinal fate and in-vivo bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 Study assessing impact of food digestion on bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 when loaded into nanoemulsions in a beverage. Encapsulated coenzyme Q10 bioavailability increased 2.8-fold as part of the beverage. Food digestion (e.g. lipolysis) can substantially influence absorption of hydrophobic bioactive components.

Journal of Controlled Release 327:444

ARTICLE

2020 Niu Z, Thielen I, Dave A, Loveday SM, and Singh H. Emulsions stabilised by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 40 stearate and lactoferrin for protection of lactoferrin during digestion Study assessing whether bioactive proteins at the interface of emulsions can be protected by PEG chains during in-vitro gastrointestinal digestion. After 2 hours of gastric digestion, 84% of lactoferrin in PEG emulsions was protected. PEG 40 shows promise as a food-grade emulsifier to prevent premature gastric digestion of bioactive proteins.

Food Biophysics

ARTICLE

2019 Nowak E, Livney Y, Niu Z, and Singh H. Delivery of bioactives in food for optimal efficacy: what inspirations and insights can be gained from pharmaceuticals? Review of the state of the art of delivery systems for bioactive compounds in food, including discussion of concepts used in drug delivery.

Trends in Food Science & Technology 91:557

ARTICLE

2019 Niu Z, Loveday S, Barbe V, Thielen I, He Y, and Singh H. Protection of native lactoferrin under gastric conditions through complexation with pectin and chitosan. Study assessing digestive fate of lactoferrin encapsulated in pectin-based colloidal system with and without chitosan. Both pectin and chitosan systems retained >90% of the lactoferrin, with chitosan-coated complexes also delaying degradation of released lactoferrin.

Food Hydrocolloids 93:120

ARTICLE

2019 Niu Z, Thielen I, Barnett A, Loveday S, and Singh H. ε-Polylysine and β-cyclodextrin assembling as delivery systems for gastric protection of proteins and possibility to enhance intestinal permeation Study assessing a nanocomplex’s capacity to entrap proteins for gastric protection. Up to 100% entrapment was achieved, contingent on protein type. Nanocomplexes were able to protect against proteolysis, and results indicate they have potential to enhance paracellular permeability of bioactive macromolecules.

Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 546:312

ARTICLE

2019 Rashidinejad A, Loveday SM, Jameson GB, Hindmarsh JP, and Singh H. Rutin-casein co-precipitates as potential delivery vehicles for flavonoid rutin Study to develop a cost-effective, biocompatible, and biodegradable delivery system for rutin (polyphenolic compound). Results indicated that appropriate pH-treatment of rutin and co-precipitation with sodium caseinate in presence or absence of trehalose resulted in powder suitable as a delivery system for rutin-fortified foods.

Food Hydrocolloids 96:451

ARTICLE